LulzSec, Anonymous, and Hacktivism

Posted on June 24, 2011 | 2 minute read

I’ve refrained from making a post about the recent and ongoing Anonymous and LulzSec debacles. It seems hacktivist groups are popping up all over the place and the internet is becoming a giant turf war.

Personally, I think that a lot of the things these groups are doing are completely stupid and unnecessary. However, I am glad they exist. I am glad someone exists who is willing to start a movement. They may be too extremist and irresponsible for my taste, but it’s better than not having them at all. It’s good to both know and show the government that it is not infallible - the recent attacks on the Arizona police department, FBI, and CIA (attempted?) go to show that. I even agree with some of their attacks, just not most of them.

For me the most interesting thing is that they aren’t really doing anything special. It’s not like all these super-hackers just sprung up overnight and are now running loose over the interwebs. They are not using sophisticated hacking methods as far as we know and even if they aren’t just DDoSing the crap out of websites anymore it’s not like they’re employing tactics that haven’t already been seeb before. So really the big difference now is that they’re suddenly doing it in the open to make a public statement (and the lulz of course).

And the more we hear about groups like LulzSec carrying out these attacks the more mainstream the idea gets to other hackers - I’m betting you’ll have more copycats and splinter groups than you can count in the near future. I always thought the internet was kind of an anarchic place already and now it’s just going five steps further to really drive that point home.

I haven’t looked at the Arizona documents (yet), but LulzSec claims that it includes personal details of officers as well as information about gang infiltration and such. I hope the documents don’t actually release individual involved in infiltrating gangs and drug rings or LulzSec can end up with blood on its keyboards.




Categories:technology
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